Tech Tuesday: Get Your Film On

19 Apr

There’s the purists who still shoot portraiture and weddings on film; they’re dedicated to the artform, the beautiful detail and grain, the mystique which film provides.

Then there are the adapters who traded-in their darkroom for a Lightroom years ago (some reluctantly – myself included), and embraced the new, the faster, the digital.

And finally, there’s the newest wave of photographers who rock the digital, and have had a very different upbringing from the old school crowd.

It would seem in this world of hyper-newness; of fancy software, plug-ins, gadgets and gear coming out at warp-speed, that the end of films existence would be in sight. But no! There are some photographers out there who are dedicated and passionate about keeping it alive and well – and Jonathan Canlas is taking it a step further, by sharing his love for film with the masses in The FIND Guide.

(click to enlarge)

Rather than paraphrase, I’ll just let Jonathan tell you in his own words:

You’re ready to start shooting film but don’t know where to start. Or you used to shoot film and would like to take up the habit again, but don’t know what’s available in today’s market.

You’re a little intimidated by the hows and whats and thingamabobs involved in making film a part of your life — whether in a professional or personal sense.

You’ve heard about film’s magic: the ease of use, the toning, the ways it can nearly eliminate post-processing and make your workflow simpler.

You’re not looking for a magic bullet. You’re willing to learn, experiment and grow as a photographer.

I’m Jonathan Canlas, and I created the FIND guide to help you enter the world of film shooting with just a teeny budget and a desire to learn more about my favorite topic of all time. FILM.”

(click to enlarge)

So what’s the deal? For $149 The FIND Guide gets you a look inside Jonathan’s bag, beautiful image samples for inspiration, and detailed descriptions and tips to get started shooting film yourself. Once you hit submit it’s a digital download, so you could read and put the tips to practice the same day. And photogs who’ve used it, rave about it, like this one from Kim Orlandini:

“The Film is Not Dead guide is a staple every photographer should not be without. I don’t care if you shoot digital or film, it will make you a better photographer by inspiring you to find your voice, to shoot what you love, and to add a little film back into who you and what you are trying to say to the world. Sometimes seeing who you are can be difficult when you are staring at the back of an LCD screen.”

The FIND Guide doesn’t include specifics on shooting weddings or any business tips, so keep that in mind. If you’re curious you can download a free sample and explore the site to see for yourself.

If you’re looking for something more submersive, Jonathan also offers workshops dedicated to the craft, which you can check out on his Film is Not Dead blog. The next one coming up is this November in Hawaii, and covers a much more detailed list cirriculum including: Film – who/what/when/where/why/how, Getting Published, Story-telling through Details, Loving Family Formals, Instaproofs – How it will change your life!, Making Every Event Publishable, Hands-on Flash Demo, Posing, The Power of a Blog, How to Define Your Vision and more… All that and a trip to paradise for $1500 (plus your transportation).

Do you love film too? Or are you a die-hard digital guru? Would like to write a post to share your thoughts or ideas with the Photo Betties? Give us a shout! Email heather@ or jenna@phillyphotobetties.com and send us details. We’d love to hear from you!

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5 Responses to “Tech Tuesday: Get Your Film On”

  1. Heather O'Mara April 19, 2011 at 1:04 pm #

    For those interested in film, but scratching your head on the investment and darkroom time, I have a challenge I read about. Back in my film days, there was no chimping. You shot, crossed your fingers and took images to the darkroom to see the magic that happened, or didn’t, before your eyes. Decide to take your camera out for a test drive, covering up the screen that would show you your shots. Shoot and review later when you have finished all your work and left where you are. I recently read this on a blog and took it for a test drive. Loved it.

  2. hdipiazza April 19, 2011 at 1:12 pm #

    Great tip Heather O! I heard someone recently say they used a black piece of gaffer’s tape to prevent them from sneaking a peek 😉

    I remember the cross-your-fingers-that-it-came-out days as well. And actually, wasn’t it kind of cool? The anticipation? The surprise!

    If you have it, could you share the link to the blog post you mentioned above? I’d love to check it out…

  3. debbie April 19, 2011 at 1:23 pm #

    This is why I have all the equipment in the basement. Someday, with a studio space or a house with a great basement… I am building my darkroom!!!

  4. Tara Jones April 19, 2011 at 1:35 pm #

    Love this! I’ve recently started back up with film (my first love) and just adore it…all over again 🙂

  5. Lindsey April 20, 2011 at 8:40 am #

    Thanks for sharing this post! I love film and still shoot it myself 🙂

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